She-Ra and the Princesses of Power

In 1985, the popularity of the show He-Man and its toy line prompted the creation of a spin-off called She-Ra: Princess of Power, which was meant to appeal to a female audience. The show ran for two seasons, and then went on to become a meme.

This year, a reboot of the show, called She-Ra and the Princesses of Power (I know, the titles are confusingly similar), premiered on Netflix. I checked it out because everyone online was going crazy over the ship Catadora, and I of course had my New Year’s resolution to try new things whenever someone says “I recommend it.” Was it as good as everyone said it was?

Well, to put it simply, this was the first full show I’ve ever binged. … More She-Ra and the Princesses of Power

Creativity Inc. by Amy Wallace with Ed Catmull (2014)

I hate anyone who tries to tell other writers how to write, who pretends to know the exact elements that a story “must” have. Anyone who thinks that there is a clear formula or clear method of creating a story is diluted.

Creativity Inc. was recommended to me by a good friend years ago, but I only got around to reading it this holiday season because of my New Year’s resolution to read and watch things that people recommended to me (as opposed to putting it off for weeks, months, or years). And hey, the title was about unleashing creativity, not work-shopping a story. How bad could it be?

It was phenomenal.  … More Creativity Inc. by Amy Wallace with Ed Catmull (2014)

The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling (1997)

What I find interesting about my history with Harry Potter is that every time I read the series, it seemed to change. I had different opinions, enjoyed different parts, and noticed different things about it. Perhaps that will always happen with every book I reread, perhaps it will stop happening when I stop growing, or perhaps it’s a quirk of the series itself.

But what did I think of it this time, reading it just before my junior year of college? … More The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling (1997)

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (1932)

Originally published 2/27/2016. Lead image via Wikipedia. 5 STARS You may have heard the phrase “Brave New World” before. It’s from Shakespeare. And a character in Brave New World doesn’t just happen to say it; he actually quotes Shakespeare all the time. This was, once again, a book I was required to read in English class (though … More Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (1932)

10 Quick Reviews: Incredibles 2, Marvel, Prince of Egypt, Kubo, and Portal

This summer was a summer of movie watching and videogame playing. So as summer comes to a close, I want to take a blog post to do some quick reviews on pieces I didn’t have too many thoughts about. I mean hey, if you don’t have a lot of thoughts about one movie, why not just shove ten others together?  … More 10 Quick Reviews: Incredibles 2, Marvel, Prince of Egypt, Kubo, and Portal

The Dragon with a Chocolate Heart by Stephanie Burgis (2017)

Casually combining chocolate and dragons, as children’s books should.

The Dragon with a Chocolate Heart follows the story of a young dragon named Aventurine who is turned into a human by a “food mage” who tricks her into drinking cursed hot chocolate. Once a human, her dragon family no longer recognizes her so she has to join human society and get an apprenticeship, which she chooses to do at a “chocolate house.”

Overall, I’d definitely recommend this book to kids and even teens, but I’m not too certain if it holds up for adults.  … More The Dragon with a Chocolate Heart by Stephanie Burgis (2017)

Life is Strange by Dontnod Entertainment (2015)

In my view, whether or not someone likes this game is entirely dependent on how they view Chloe Price by the end of it. Chloe has a strong personality, which will polarize people: either they will be fond of her at the end, or hate her at the end, with hardly any in between. This makes the game fuck up people who learn to love her (like me). I do want to mention, however, that I hated Chloe at first. More on that in the spoilers section… … More Life is Strange by Dontnod Entertainment (2015)

The Alice Network by Kate Quinn (2017)

I’m not sure whether to call this “Girl Power: the Novel” or “PTSD: the Novel.”

The Alice Network is a historical fiction novel telling the combined stories of Charlie Sinclair and Evelyn Gardener, who both lost a close, spirited friend to the cruelties of the two world wars. They team up in search of Charlie’s missing cousin, Rose, and in the end discover that their experiences were quite similar, embrace independence, and finally hunt down the person who wronged them both.

Now, I don’t think you should read this book. … More The Alice Network by Kate Quinn (2017)