The Flood Thieves Chapter 1: The First Record

“Red Spirit…” she cursed. “It’s a spirit!” Making sure that her family was not awake, she slipped both legs out of the window. She wouldn’t be able to lock the door downstairs from the outside, and she couldn’t leave her family vulnerable to Soikles — this was the only remaining way out. She maneuvered down the path her sister always took to sneak out at night during the Southern Season and swim in the river. She slipped clumsily and crashed to the ground, her elbone digging into the soft earth. She yanked it out. The Qhilla was now all the way in between the homes adjacent to hers; this was no ordinary creature. Patcha ran after it, and found herself hard pressed to keep up. Every now and then, she would blink, and it would be lost from sight.

She was some ways out of the village and uphill, toward the temple, when a nearby holler met her ears. She faltered for just a moment, and the Qhilla vanished. She cursed, knowing that she had to help instead of following the spirit. She shot off in the direction of the cries. It wasn’t long before her blood ran cold at the sight of Soikle tracks among the shrubbery.

A boy was cornered on the foundation of an abandoned store house. He had a sling, useless to him at such close proximity, slung over his right shoulder. He instead used his gloved left hand to wield a traveling stick coated in frost. The pack of tiny Soikles, each no larger than a Meesee[16], seemed to have just cornered the cloaked young man, who retreated as far back as he could on the foundation before reaching a wall. He leaped forwards again as some of the Soikles attempted to climb the base with their hairy black legs, swatting them with his icy staff to keep them away. … More The Flood Thieves Chapter 1: The First Record

Is sexism in high fantasy “just being realistic?”

My friends and I play Dungeons and Dragons, and we all normally play characters of our own gender. I barely remember what the situation was, but a situation once arose during a D&D session where my character wanted to do something, and another player said that the NPC wouldn’t allow it because I was a woman and the middle ages were sexist. 

I was completely taken aback. We weren’t including plague, infant mortality, or suicide in our campaign — in fact, there wasn’t even any gore, sex, or curse words unless the players specified it. The DM was PG at its finest. We were obviously including medieval elements that made things fun, like swords and tyrant kings, but omitting things that would make it less fun, like weight limits and bestiality. So why would sexism be built in to the world?  … More Is sexism in high fantasy “just being realistic?”

What is Dungeons and Dragons?

Everyone seems to know the name “Dungeons and Dragons” and picture something in mind at its mention, but few people seem to know what the game actually is. “Math geeks dress up to play a Medieval board game that makes them forget about how crappy their lives are” is usually what I hear.

Well, just as Luke Skywalker said: “Impressive…every word in that sentence was wrong.” … More What is Dungeons and Dragons?

13 Different Ways to Hide Another World

Originally published 1/8/2017
Worlds can be difficult to introduce to audiences without overwhelming them, or it may be difficult to justify the existence of real-world features in the entirely fantasy world. This is where you get places like Hogwarts or the Batcave, which give you an entirely different basket of strengths and weaknesses. 

Today, we will be focusing on the latter: fantasy or scifi worlds that your protagonist must discover, and the different ways they’re been discovered throughout the ages. Time for a rapid-fire list! … More 13 Different Ways to Hide Another World