Knives Out by Rian Johnson (2019)

Before the virus, my friends recommended that I go see Knives Out. However, my town essentially shut down the day I was going to see it, so I had to wait some time to watch it on demand with my family at home. But Jesus Mary Christ was it worth the wait. 

Now, I know everyone is already raving about this movie. So I’m probably preaching to the choir here, but just in case you haven’t heard: Knives Out is now tied for my favorite movie of all time. Yes, of all time.

I always worry about hearing hype for a movie or book, because I don’t want to be disappointed while watching/reading it. I worried that Knives Out would have this issue, but I enjoyed it far more than my friends made it out to be (Unfortunately, now that I’ve effectively called it my all-time favorite, I’ve increased the likelihood this will actually happen to you. But you should see it, anyway!).

Because Knives Out is a whodunit murder mystery, most of the appeal lies in spoilers. I’ll split this review into a spoiler and non-spoiler section, with the second alluding to what I found appealing and what you might find appealing, as well.  … More Knives Out by Rian Johnson (2019)

Charlotte’s Web (1952 , 1973 , 2003, and 2006)

While at my parents’ place, I happened to glance over at what remains of our old VHS collection, and saw the 1973 Hannah-Barbara adaptation of Charlotte’s Web. I realized that I’d never read the book, and hadn’t seen the movie in what must be over ten years.

So here we are.

I read the book and watched ALL of the film adaptations of the book. How do they compare? … More Charlotte’s Web (1952 , 1973 , 2003, and 2006)

The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling (1997)

What I find interesting about my history with Harry Potter is that every time I read the series, it seemed to change. I had different opinions, enjoyed different parts, and noticed different things about it. Perhaps that will always happen with every book I reread, perhaps it will stop happening when I stop growing, or perhaps it’s a quirk of the series itself.

But what did I think of it this time, reading it just before my junior year of college? … More The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling (1997)

Is there only one story?

Many of you have heard that there is only one story, and it keeps being retold in different forms. Is this real, and should we even care? 

The side you take in this debate boils down to your definition of a “story”. Of course every combination of letters in the alphabet is different. But the “one story” theory states that every story ever told asks the question, “Who am I?” or “What is man?” or something along those lines. In a way, this is true. Every human wants to find herself, and every society wants to know its place in the world.

But in the grand scheme of things, that doesn’t entirely matter.

Today, we’re talking about the implications of “cliches”, and how many people believe that it’s impossible to have an entirely original story. … More Is there only one story?

MoneyBall: The Art of Winning and Unfair Game by Michael Lewis (2003)

Moneyball is not what I expected it to be. I expected it to be a depressing account of how math and machines are slowly going to stamp out our individuality, but the narrative I read was quite different. It was about merit triumphing over appearance, about strategy outdoing wealth, about brain beating brawn, about overlooked young rookies finally being given a chance. It’s one of those untold, hope-inspiring stories of a quiet revolution happening right under our noses. … More MoneyBall: The Art of Winning and Unfair Game by Michael Lewis (2003)